[Reading] ➵ Pagan Britain ➼ Ronald Hutton – Buyphenergan500.us

Pagan Britain Britain S Pagan Past, With Its Mysterious Monuments, Atmospheric Sites, Enigmatic Artifacts, Bloodthirsty Legends, And Cryptic Inscriptions, Is Both Enthralling And Perplexing To A Resident Of The Twenty First Century In This Ambitious And Thoroughly Up To Date Book, Ronald Hutton Reveals The Long Development, Rapid Suppression, And Enduring Cultural Significance Of Paganism, From The Paleolithic Era To The Coming Of Christianity He Draws On An Array Of Recently Discovered Evidence And Shows How New Findings Have Radically Transformed Understandings Of Belief And Ritual In Britain Before The Arrival Of Organized Religion Setting Forth A Chronological Narrative, Hutton Along The Way Makes Side Visits To Explore Specific Locations Of Ancient Pagan Activity He Includes The Well Known Sacred Sites Stonehenge, Avebury, Seahenge, Maiden Castle, Anglesey As Well As Obscure Locations Across The Mainland And Coastal Islands In Tireless Pursuit Of The Elusive Why Of Pagan Behavior, Hutton Astonishes With The Breadth Of His Understanding Of Britain S Deep Past And Inspires With The Originality Of His Insights.

[Reading] ➵ Pagan Britain  ➼ Ronald Hutton – Buyphenergan500.us
  • Hardcover
  • 496 pages
  • Pagan Britain
  • Ronald Hutton
  • English
  • 09 August 2017
  • 0300197713

    10 thoughts on “[Reading] ➵ Pagan Britain ➼ Ronald Hutton – Buyphenergan500.us


  1. says:

    So ive read this diligently for a while now in the 4 page conclusion section it tells me that basically we don t really have a Scooby about Pagan man before the RomansI wanted to like itI really did as a lot of research effort thought has gone into writing this but..I feel slightly tricked as Ive not discove...


  2. says:

    This may not be the definitive text on paganism in Britain before and during the Christian era but it is not going to be easily bettered in terms of grand narrative.Hutton s approach, not at all unsympathetic to the way we all imaginatively reconstruct the world out of slender evidence, is highly sceptical of academic claims to know very much about paganism.Until we reach the historical record, imperfectly represented for Roman evidence and only becoming clearer during the Middle Ages, what we h This may not be the definitive text on paganism in Britain before and during the Christian era but it is not going to be easily bettered in terms of grand narrative.Hutton s approach, not at all unsympathetic to the way we all imaginatively reconstruct the world out of slender evidence, is highly sceptical of academic claims to know very much about paganism.Until we reach the historical record, imperfectly represented for Roman evidence and only becoming clearer during the Middle Ages, what we have is material evidence that ca...


  3. says:

    This is yet another book that gives an overview of pagan European cultures from the Palaeolithic to the Dark Ages I ve read so many of these lately that I admit that I m starting to find it slightly soporific This book focuses on Britain in particular, as opposed to the whole of Europe, but nevertheless it ends up covering much of the same ground That said, I do like how up to date the book is with current thought in the archaeological field It rejects the male female dichotomy that was one This is yet another book that gives an overview of pagan European cultures from the Palaeolithic to the Dark Ages I ve read so many of these lately that I admit that I m starting to find it slightly soporific This book focuses on Britain in particular, as opposed to the whole of Europe, but nevertheless it ends up covering much of the same ground That said, I do like how up to date the book is with current thought in the archaeological field It rejects the male female dichotomy that was one time applied inexplicably to Palaeolithic art, and David Lewis Williams later ideas about shamanic symbols And in contrast to the two others books I ve recently read about pagan religion in Europe Jean Markale s The Great Goddess and Marija Gimbutas The Living Goddesses Ronald Hutton takes a muchobjective view, noting the lack of evidence for a unified mother goddess and pointedly highlighting how this hypothesis arose out of Romantic idealism of the 18th ...


  4. says:

    What a fantastic book One learnsfrom one book by Ronald Hutton than from a whole library of folklorism and esoterica , and that is particularly true for this book It s 400 dense pages in which Hutton with his typical flair and clarity discusses the archaeological, textual, and symbolic evidence about paganism in Britain This book retains Hutton s characteristic union of extremely solid historiography and scientific discussion with a personal sympathy for the validity of mystical, neopa What a fantastic book One learnsfrom one book by Ronald Hutton than from a whole library of folklorism and esoterica , and that is particularly true for this book It s 400 dense pages in which Hutton with his typical flair and clarity discusses the archaeological, textual, and symbolic evidence about paganism in Britain This book retains Hutton s characteristic union of extremely solid historiography and scientific discussion with a personal sympathy for the validity of mystical, neopagan etc interpretations of the past, but unlike some of his previous works does not concern itself with neopaganism itself or the reception history as separate topics Here, the discussion is strictly limited to historical paganism in Britain, from the Paleolithic to the last Viking vestiges As one might expect, the general conclusion from the work is that we know next to nothing of prehistoric paganism and little indeed about historic paganism, simply because such mat...


  5. says:

    This is one of those books that you see in the book store, you read the back and find yourself intrigued.Sadly, while it does a great deal of work speculating on what COULD have been, what MIGHT have been, what SHOULD have been, there is far too much inconclusive postulating about what could have been that you...


  6. says:

    This is one of those books where you learn something new on every second page, and the pages in between those each give you pause for thought The main thing you learn is that many of the commonly held assumptions about this topic are simply wrong, and that much assumed ancient pagan practice or evidence has in fact a much younger pedigree Still I do like the way that while he politely and painstakingly unpicks the supposed deep history of many of these things that he still leaves space for the This is one of those books where you learn something new on every seco...


  7. says:

    Spotted in The Guardian To seek the best deal


  8. says:

    Professor Hutton is, perhaps, one of the most affable and publicly recognisable academics in Britain today and, arguably, its greatest authority on this country s pagan history and heritage In this volume, he sets himself the task of surveying the rise and fall of paganism in our island story, from the distant Palaeolithic to the early modern period However, whereas the matter of the pagan revivalism of the past century is touched upon, it is not treated in any depth in itself, although it is Professor Hutton is, perhaps, one of the most affable and publicly recognisable academics in Britain today and,...


  9. says:

    I really enjoyed Prof Hutton s multi disciplinary approach to the material Also his presenting the evidence we have and haven t got and leaving it to the audience to choose the interpretations they most support is great Wishacademics wrote like this.


  10. says:

    You can t fault Ronald Hutton for lack of thoroughness I was just kind of disappointed that all than can be said is we really have no way of knowing.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *